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Victorian Cookery: Recipes and History

Victorian Cookery: Recipes and History
by Maggie Black
  With more than 30 recipes covering the whole range of Victorian society, this book gives a fascinating insight into the way food was prepared and enjoyed by our ancestors.
  More information and prices from:
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Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management

Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management
by Isabella Beeton
  A founding text of Victorian middle-class identity, Household Management is today one of the great unread classics. To the modern reader expecting stuffy moralizing and watery vegetables, Beeton's book is a revelation: it ranges widely across the foods of Europe and beyond, actively embracing new foodstuffs and techniques, mixing domestic advice with discussions of science, religion, class, industrialism and gender roles.
  More information and prices from:
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Peppermint - Victorian Recipes

From 'The Dictionary of Daily Wants' - 1859

PEPPERMINT CORDIAL. - To make five gallons of this cordial, take three and a quarter gallons of rectified spirit, three pounds of loaf sugar, a gill of spirit of wine, four pennyweights of oil of peppermint; fill up the cask with water until the quantity becomes five gallons rouse it well, and set the cask on end.

PEPPERMINT DROPS. - Pound and Sift a quarter of a pound of double-refined sugar, and beat it with the whites of two eggs till perfectly smooth; add sixty drops of oil of peppermint, beat it well, drop it on white paper, and dry it at a distance from the fire.

PEPPERMINT LOZENGES. - Take two pounds of loaf sugar, two ounces of fine starch, and a few drops of essence of peppermint; mix these ingredients with gum tragacanth ; form into drops, and bake.

PEPPERMINT WATER. - Take of the herb of peppermint, dried, a pound and a half, and as much water as will prevent it from burning; after seething, distil off a gallon, and bottle for use.

More Victorian Recipes



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